Motherhood Energy

“I learned that being a mother takes a lot of energy. They weren’t talking about the calorie-burning energy, although you do need plenty of that. It was more like the kind of emotional energy that is consumed by patience the kind of energy you expend when you must continually concentrate on preventing yourself from exploding. Like handing a toddler a whole plate of food is like handing her a playground. That’s the kind of energy we’re talking about here.”

by Julia Sweeney
from the book ‘If It’s Not One Thing, It’s Your Mother’

Book Review and To-do

I just finished a book that is a biography. Title : One Day It’ll All Make Sense by Common with Adam Bradley. The author is an American rapper, actor and film producer. I was attracted by the title that it’s like telling you how life can be full of question marks but in the end, it’ll all make sense.

One Day It'll All Make Sense

So yeah it started out with the story of a broken family that he came from and how from there he went through life achieving his dreams. Nicely written and thoughtful but also too detailed and so many names mentioned. Nevertheless, what I really like is that throughout the chapters, there are passages written by his mother speaking her view of his life from her perspectives.  It’s like a parenting book as well.

At the end of the book, there’s a study guide by Dr. Mahala Hines discussing on the topics to relate the contents of the book with us. For example :

“Rashid (the actual name of Common) writes about love and fear influencing the decisions he makes. How do love and fear influence the decisions you make?”

Something like that. But I’m not interested with that one. I’ve picked these two prologue activities as my to-do’s :

In the prologue, Rashid states, “I also realize that my life is an expression of all those I have known and all who have known me.”
List at least five people who have made an impression on your life. Explain how each person has shaped who you are today.

In the chapter Take It Ez, Rashid wrote a letter to his younger self. His own person who once did not know what the future had in store.
Write a letter to yourself as if you are a thirty-year-old reflecting on your youth.

Now, does this mean I have a homework? Yes, one that has no deadlines 😀

Till the next post,
SALZY

I Like Me Best

“Nowadays, I often speak to a group of young mothers. They ask me, “Well, how were you be able to raise your son the way you did?”

To begin with, I never liked him more than I liked me. I don’t mean love – I loved him more than anything. But I always liked me best. If you don’t like yourself, it makes it very hard to like and love your child.

So when I was raising Rashid, there’s no way that he could have three pair of shoes if I only had two. And I’m the one working? That’s not reasonable, mothers.

How in the world do these young mothers go buy their child a designer something that costs a hundred dollars and you don’t have a savings account? You don’t have a house. You live in an apartment.”

From the book “One Day It’ll All Make Sense”
by Common with Adam Bradley
The quote above was from his Mother